PROJECT PORTFOLIO

  • Overview
  • P1: Define
  • P2: Separate
  • P3: Extract
  • P4: Control
  • P5: Operate

direct download crc ore project pipelineCRC ORE Project Portfolio

CRC ORE's project portfolio is delivered across five key areas:

  • Program 1: Define - Improving feed quality
  • Program 2: Separate - Enabling mass separation
  • Program 3: Extract - Increasing extraction efficiency
  • Program 4: Control - Maximising system-value
  • Program 5: Operate - Implementation at mine sites

Use the tabs above to read more about each of the programs and access snapshots on CRC ORE's projects.

Each project is designed to progress technologies through the widely used Technology Readiness Levels (TRL 1-9) scale of technology maturity, often referred to as ‘prototype to product’. This is a shared partnership model based on stage-gated project development. 

The first four key program areas represent the early stages of the TRL scale, focussing on TRL3-5 activities. This involves taking technology concepts through analytical and experimental proof of concept into laboratory or desk-top validation and to an early prototype stage, which is suitable for further refinement and testing under realistic world conditions. The fifth area is CRC ORE's utilisation projects. Through its collaborative partnerships, CRC ORE undertakes testing of technologies at mine sites around the world as the platform for its research and development. This is aimed at progressing technologies through TRL 5-9.

Technology Readiness Levels (TRL)
 TRL 1     Basic principles observed or reported   Concept
 TRL 2  Technology concept or application formulated  
 TRL 3     Analytical and experimental proof of concept   Laboratory
 
 TRL 4   
 Laboratory validation and initial value proposition  
 TRL 5     System model tested in simulated or realistic environment    Realistic
World 
 TRL 6     System model tested on end user site with refinement of positive value proposition  
 TRL 7     System prototype demonstrated on end user site   Real
World
 TRL 8     Commercially relevant system deployed on end user site with proven value proposition
 
 TRL 9
   Actual system proven reliable through operation    Real Business

 

Description & requirements

 TRL 1

   

Basic principles observed or reported

Lowest level of technology maturation. At this level scientific research begins to be translated in applied R&D.

         

 TRL 2

Technology concept or application formulated

 

Once basic physical principles are observed then at the next level or maturation practical applications of those characteristics can be invented or identified. At this level, the application is still speculative: there is not experimental proof or detailed analysis to support the conjecture.

         

 TRL 3 

Analytical and experimental proof of concept

 

At this step in the maturation process, active R&D is initiated. This must include both analytical studies to set the technology into an appropriate content and lab-based studies to physically validate the analytical predictions. These studies and experiments should constitute POC validation of the applications/concepts formulated at TRL 2.

         

 TRL 4 

 

Laboratory validation and initial value proposition

 

Following successful POC work, basic technology elements must be integrated to establish they will work together to achieve concept-enabling levels of performance for a component. This validation must support the earlier concept and should be consistent with the requirements of potential system applications. The validation is low-fidelity compared to the eventual system – it could be composed of ad hoc discrete components in a lab. 

         

 TRL 5 

System model tested in simulated or realistic environment

 

Fidelity of the components being tested has to increase significantly. The basic technology elements or models must be integrated with reasonably realistic supporting elements so that total applications (component-level, sub-system level, or system level) can be tested in a realistic environment. 

         

 TRL 6 

System model tested on end user site with refinement of positive value proposition

 

A Major step in the level of fidelity following completion of TRL5. At TRL6 a representative model/prototype system/system must be tested in an end user site environment. This typically results in enhancements. Potential commercial partners will have been identified or already engaged. 

         

 TRL 7 

System prototype demonstrated on end user site

 

A significant step beyond TRL6 requiring an actual system prototype demonstration on end user site. The prototype should be near or at scale of planned operations system and deployment with commercial partners involved. 

         

 TRL 8 

Commercially relevant system deployed on end user site with proven value proposition

 

In almost all cases this is the end of true system development for most technology elements. This can include integration of new technology into an existing system. Outcome is commercial manufacture and site uptake.

         

 TRL 9

Actual system proven reliable through operation

 

In almost all cases the end of last bug fixing aspects of true system development such that it is ready for routine implementation. This does not include planned product improvement. 

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Program Coodinator:
Program 1: Define
Greg Wilkie
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Greg Wilkie CRC ORE 2017

   
  Project snapshots
  Gamma Activation Analysis for geo-sensing - Phase 1 (P1-001)
  Gamma Activation Analysis for geo-sensing - Phase 2 (P1-009)
  PGNAA elemental logging for Instrumenting the Bench (P1-002)
  Magnetic resonance of covellite for geo-sensing (P1-003)
  GE.View an online tool for assessing Grade Engineering opportunities (P1-004)
  Upconversion fluorescence of minerals for geo-sensing (P1-005)
  Geological controls on grade by size deportment (P1-006)
  Surface techniques for geo-sensing (P1-007)
   
  direct download crc ore project pipeline

Program 1: Define

Improving feed quality

New and novel testing, measurement and mapping technologies to characterise and quantify waste and ore for coarse separation attributes as inputs into CRC ORE Grade Engineering® assessment and mine planning.

Program 1 includes predictive performance attributes across the five main rock interface separation levers which drive Grade Engineering® response. These attributes need to be embedded into spatial models and used to optimise mine planning and scheduling for maximum value.

Coarse separation involves concentration of valuable phases and removal of barren gangue phases in the ‘dig and deliver’ mining interface prior to costly and energy intensive processing.

In current practice attributes required to define and value coarse separation are typically not collected on operations. Program 1 aims to provide testing and modelling protocols to populate resource block models with separation attributes that can be used in mine planning and scheduling.

program 1 define coloured blocks

ORE program 1 contoured blast holes diagram
An example of definition of specific domains in a large open pit operation that drive maximum value in a Grade Engineering® assessment – in this case based on application of differential blasting for conditioning grade by size (yellow blocks).   Plan view of contoured blast hole Cu grades for a set of mining benches assigned to mill based on average cut-off grades. Ideally zones shown in green are below mill cut-off grade and represent coarse separation opportunity.
     

 


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program 1 comparative ranking graph
Comparative ranking of average preferential grade by size Response Rankings for selected deposits. Whiskers show 25th and 75th percentiles

 

 

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Program Coodinator:
Program 2: Separate
Fernando Vieira
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Fernando Vieira CRC ORE 2017

   
  Project snapshots
  Sensors for rock mass characterisation (P2-001)
  Blast design optimisation for Grade Engineering (P2-002)
  Orebody DNA (P2-003)
  LIBS analysis for Geo-sensing (P2-004)
   
  direct download crc ore project pipeline

Program 2: Separate

Enabling mass separation

Integration of operational strategies and engineering solutions to effect coarse separation in the dig and deliver interface optimised for net value.

Integration of operational strategies and engineering solutions to effect coarse separation in the dig and deliver interface optimised for net value.

This includes advanced blasting design and fragmentation controls; bench scale down hole and top of hole sensors; screening for grade by size conditioned run of mine material; and on-line sensors for coarse material flows at shovel, truck and conveyor belt scales.

The aim is to generate new higher-grade feed streams through physical removal of low value components at coarse (10-1000 mm) particle size distributions after blasting and primary crushing.

The ultimate aim is to undertake coarse separation in-pit as part of dynamic short-term mine planning. This involves design of radical in pit crushing and separation equipment that can also improve digging and loading efficiencies.

 

sorting

 

blast

 

sandvik in pit modified graphic

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Program Coodinator:
Program 3: Extract
Nick Beaton
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Nick Beaton CRC ORE 2017

   
  Project snapshots
  Project snapshots will be posted here soon
   
   
  direct download crc ore project pipeline

Program 3: Extract

Increasing extraction efficiency

New processing circuit designs, integrated simulation capabilities and operational control systems to exploit changes in grade and other physical properties resulting from Grade Engineered feed streams.

IES

New processing circuit designs, integrated simulation capabilities and operational control systems to exploit changes in grade and other physical properties resulting from Grade Engineered feed streams.

Coarse separation ‘unpacks’ in-situ mineralogy and texture to produce new hybrid streams that can have very different properties to the original material. This includes differences in characteristics such as mineralogy, deleterious phases, particle size distribution and hardness in addition to economic grade. Material can be conditioned using different breakage energies and intensities to enhance or suppress coarse liberation.

The ability to deliver feed material that has already undergone significant coarse liberation and modification prior to traditional processing plants, enables significant changes to current circuit design and operation.

The objective is to develop sophisticated coarse liberation models and operating protocols which can be used as inputs into next generation circuit design and simulation. This includes design of new coarse separation circuits in the dig and deliver interface as well as modifications to existing circuits. The ultimate aim is to improve efficiency and productivity across a range of operating metrics such as energy intensity and water consumption in addition to net value.

 

program 3 annualised material assigned for GE
An example of annualised tonnages of material assigned for Grade Engineering® coarse separation compared to overall material movements solved for maximisation of value and fit to operational constraints.

program 3 extract

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Program Coodinator:
Program 4: Control
Paul Revell
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Paul Revell Headshot 2017

   
  Project snapshots
  Data driven models (P4-001)
   
  direct download crc ore project pipeline
   

Program 4: Control

Maximising system-value

The disruptive and dynamic opportunities that coarse separation delivers through Grade Engineering® requires a more effective approach to whole of system control and execution.

While Grade Engineering provides new value based options for manipulating insitu grade and delivering improved productivity, it can also be perceived as creating increased complexity. A high level of user defined options and dynamic scenarios challenges current practice.

The disruptive nature of having new options to applying coarse separation early in the mining and extraction cycle can appear to introduce ‘complexity’ compared to current practice. Coarse separation can be used to address a range of bottlenecks or financial targets which depend on the operating mode and maturity of individual operations (including pre-feasibility). Introduction of on-line information from coarse feed streams also introduces new data flows into control systems.

The objective is to integrate outcomes from the other Programs into management execution systems (MES) that can be used by operational decision makers to maximise efficiency and value. The dynamic nature of coarse separation as an optional process makes it especially suitable for scenario planning and options analysis.

The ultimate aim is to generate tools and knowledge that can be used to capture and manage the disruptive outcomes of Grade Engineering® as part of an overall business solution approach. This includes working with centres of expertise in organisational design and change management to ensure the benefits of disruptive new technologies can be sustained in what are often entrenched operating cultures.

program 4 control

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Program Coodinator:
Program 5: Operate
Luke Keeney
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Luke Keeney CRC ORE 2017

   
  Project snapshots
  Site snapshots are available to Participants by signing into the Members Area
  direct download crc ore project pipeline

Program 5: Operate

Implementation at mine sites

CRC ORE, through its collaborative partnerships, undertakes testing at mine sites around the world as the platform for its research and development.

These studies continue to expand, as they provide the ideal environment for industry, research and commercial partners to develop and validate step change technologies.

Projects such as these are only possible through a large scale collaborative effort, and this structure ensures the developed technologies are shaped and validated by operating mine sites and commercial providers in a way that directly addresses the industry’s requirements.

Essential Participants have access to utilisation (site) project snapshots by signing into the members area.

CRC ORE's project portfolio is delivered across five key areas. Each project is designed to progress technologies through the widely used Technology Readiness Levels (TRL 1-9) scale of technology maturity, often referred to as ‘prototype to product’.

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